Search

New Book: Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill

on 14th May 2017

“Fraser’s Hill has long been recognised as an excellent destination for bird watchers and photographers alike (Strange, 2004). However, a lesser known fact is that these highlands are also great for moth watching as well. For as long as the surrounding forests remain pristine and protected, the birds, moths and other wildlife will continue to thrive. As most moths are nocturnal, they tend to fly by night. In doing so, some will be consumed by insectivorous bats, as well as owls, nightjars and frogmouths. In the mornings, certain insectivorous birds may have them for breakfast.

Silver-eared Mesia (Photo credit: Nick Baker)
Silver-eared Mesia (Photo credit: Nick Baker)

“These include the Silver-eared Mesia (Leiothrix argentauris) (above),

Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush (Photo credit: NickBaker)
Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush (Photo credit: Nick Baker)

“Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush (Garrulax mitratus) (above),

Long-tailed Sibia (Photo credit: CW Gan)
Long-tailed Sibia (Photo credit: CW Gan)

“Long-tailed Sibia (Heterophasia picaoides) (above).

Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill

“For over a decade, we have made multiple visits to Fraser’s Hill to enjoy the ambience and photograph the flora and fauna. Particularly mesmerised by the moth diversity, we felt compelled to compile and identify our moth images, which eventually resulted in the publication of this book (above).

Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill

“Here is a selection of sample pages from within (above, below):

Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser's Hill
Marvellous Moths of Fraser’s Hill

“In total, more than 600 moth species across 18 families are featured. Through this publication, we hope to encourage a greater appreciation for moths, the lesser known siblings of perpetually popular butterflies! To get your very own copy of this book, please contact Mrs Bee Choo Strange (e-mail: [email protected]) for further details on ordering.

“A musical montage of representative moth species featured in this book may be previewed here:”

Dr. Leong Tzi Ming (on behalf of the M Team)
Singapore
12th May 2017

REFERENCE:
Strange, M. 2004. Birds of Fraser’s Hill: an Illustrated Guide and Checklist. Nature’s Niche Pte Ltd. 120 pp.

If you like this post please tap on the Like button at the left bottom of page. Any views and opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the authors/contributors, and are not endorsed by the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM, NUS) or its affiliated institutions. Readers are encouraged to use their discretion before making any decisions or judgements based on the information presented.

YC Wee

Dr Wee played a significant role as a green advocate in Singapore through his extensive involvement in various organizations and committees: as Secretary and Chairman for the Malayan Nature Society (Singapore Branch), and with the Nature Society (Singapore) as founding President (1978-1995). He has also served in the Nature Reserve Board (1987-1989), Nature Reserves Committee (1990-1996), National Council on the Environment/Singapore Environment Council (1992-1996), Work-Group on Nature Conservation (1992) and Inter-Varsity Council on the Environment (1995-1997). He is Patron of the Singapore Gardening Society and was appointed Honorary Museum Associate of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) in 2012. In 2005, Dr Wee started the Bird Ecology Study Group. With more than 6,000 entries, the website has become a valuable resource consulted by students, birdwatchers and researchers locally and internationally. The views and opinions expressed in this article are his own, and do not represent those of LKCNHM, the National University of Singapore or its affiliated institutions.

Other posts by YC Wee

3 Responses

  1. I always knew that Vilma was a keen bird watcher & now she manifests herself as a keen student of moths.
    I can imagine the patience & hard work in the study of moths , actually like insects; how do you study & photograph such tiny creatures?
    Well done , keep it up. God bless.

  2. Never kill a moth for the sake of just a photo. The best is leave them alone and admire them for what they are without the need for opening another photo gallery. Birdwatchers are all too often seen doing their activities in an bird-unfriendly way ( audio play, feeding the birds with cultivated worms, fruits).
    I have noticed birds as tame as a pet just because birdwatchers feed them continuously. The birds get sick and you can notice it by watching their feathers. Please remember that these creatures share the same and one life with us humans. Please do not make them subject to any unfriendly method of photography. Remember LIVE and LET LIVE.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Categories
Archives

Overall visits (since 2005)

Live visitors
483
11607
Visitors Today
52855025
Total
Visitors

Clustrmaps (since 2016)