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Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 2. Food for the chicks

on 29th June 2015

“When I posted the Pin-striped Tit-babbler (Macronous gularis) nest HERE, some responded by saying ‘could not see the nest’. Yes I agree, this is one of the best camouflaged nest I have seen. I have posted an updated image of the nest (bottom – nest in center of image) as heavy rain has pushed the reeds and structure down; nest still intact.

“I have gone back twice to try and obtain information on prey for chicks, as there is limited information on prey taken by this species.

“Not only is the nest near invisible, the birds are superb at entering the nest without me spotting them. It near ‘impossible’ to watch them as when I approach 10-12 meters away they change their routine. The usually behaviour (seen 5 times) is to land on a strategic branch to see if things safe, drop lower and then enter the nest. But when I am anywhere near the nest they will approach from the rear and work their way through the undergrowth from the back. All I get to see is a bit of foliage movement. Chicks are silent throughout.

“Managed, by intermittent visits (walking away and returning) to image a few episodes. The food brought to chicks, that I have seen so far, is all animal prey. A grasshopper, a large spider and a caterpillar (images, respectively from top down).”

Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia
29th June & 1st July 2014

Location: Ulu Kinta Forest Reserve, Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia
Habitat: Previously logged forest with secondary growth and some primary forest

If you like this post please tap on the Like button at the left bottom of page. Any views and opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the authors/contributors, and are not endorsed by the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM, NUS) or its affiliated institutions. Readers are encouraged to use their discretion before making any decisions or judgements based on the information presented.

YC Wee

Dr Wee played a significant role as a green advocate in Singapore through his extensive involvement in various organizations and committees: as Secretary and Chairman for the Malayan Nature Society (Singapore Branch), and with the Nature Society (Singapore) as founding President (1978-1995). He has also served in the Nature Reserve Board (1987-1989), Nature Reserves Committee (1990-1996), National Council on the Environment/Singapore Environment Council (1992-1996), Work-Group on Nature Conservation (1992) and Inter-Varsity Council on the Environment (1995-1997). He is Patron of the Singapore Gardening Society and was appointed Honorary Museum Associate of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) in 2012. In 2005, Dr Wee started the Bird Ecology Study Group. With more than 6,000 entries, the website has become a valuable resource consulted by students, birdwatchers and researchers locally and internationally. The views and opinions expressed in this article are his own, and do not represent those of LKCNHM, the National University of Singapore or its affiliated institutions.

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