Scavenging birds of Perth, Australia

posted in: Miscellaneous | 8

Here in Singapore, we get the ubiquitous Rock Pigeon (Columba livia), the Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus) and the House Crow (Corvus splendens) scavenging leftover food in open-air hawker centres and garbage dumps. Over in Pangkor Island in nearby Malaysia, the Oriental Pied Hornbills (Anthracoceros albirostris) are commonly found in touristy areas where they are fed with leftover food.

In Perth, Australia, Johnny Wee documented another set of birds that thrive on leftover food in open-air food courts. The Silvereye (Zosterops lateralis) (above left), a common Australian garden bird and the wren (above right), take leftover cakes. On the other hand the New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) which takes nectar under natural conditions, scavenge leftover maple syrup (left).

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8 Responses

  1. […] Bird Ecology Study Group » Scavenging birds of Perth, Australia besgroup.talfrynature.com/2010/08/16/scavenging-birds-of-perth-australia/ – view page – cached Here in Singapore, we get the ubiquitous Rock Pigeon (Columba livia), the Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus) and the House Crow (Corvus splendens) scavenging leftover food in open-air hawker centres and garbage dumps. Over in Pangkor Island in nearby Malaysia, the Oriental Pied Hornbills (Anthracoceros albirostris) are commonly found in touristy areas where they are fed with leftover food. Tweets about this link […]

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  2. Amar-Singh HSS (Dato, Dr)

    I believe this can happen in Australia because the public respect birds and do not harm them (in general). I have often found birds in industrialized countries (e.g. UK) friendlier than locally. Hope we can cultivate such human behavior in our region.

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  3. Well, I would like to add that this was happening in Frasers’ Hill at the Jelai Resort, where the Long-tailed Sibias would come round to the breakfast table and take the bread off the birders, and bird photographers, while in Singapore Javan Mynas, Sparrows often hang around tables at hawker centers, while at our Botanic Gardens White Breasted Waterhens and Red Legged Crake can be a few feet away from human traffic.

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  4. Sun Chong Hong

    Perhaps the White Breasted Waterhens and Red Legged Crake in Botanic Gardens are used to the heavy human traffic there. In my condo where the waterhens are sighted once in a while (see my video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-4VXC9M038 ), they are extremely shy. They would look for cover once they have sighted me. Sometimes they would fly to a nearby small tree if there were no other suitable hiding places. On one occasion one bird ran for cover when I was in my car about 30 m away (see video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8678mF3kI4 ).

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  5. Sun Chong Hong

    Perhaps the White Breasted Waterhens and Red Legged Crake in Botanic Gardens are used to the heavy human traffic. In my condo where the waterhens are sighted once in a while (see my video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-4VXC9M038 ), they are extremely shy. They would look for cover once they have sighted me. Sometimes they would fly to a nearby small tree if there were no other suitable hiding places. On one occassion one bird ran for cover when I was in my car about 30 m away (see video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8678mF3kI4 ).

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  6. Sun Chong Hong

    Perhaps the White Breasted Waterhens and Red Legged Crake in Botanic Gardens are used to the heavy human traffic. In my condo where the waterhens are sighted once in a while (see my video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-4VXC9M038 ), they are extremely shy. They would look for cover once they have sighted me. Sometimes they would fly to a nearby small tree if there were no other suitable hiding places. On one occasion one bird ran for cover when I was in my car about 30 m away (see video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8678mF3kI4 ).

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  7. The different species of birds that are playing and flying around the park is another attraction for tourists.

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  8. Tou Jing Yi

    Each individual of birds definitely learned the danger by experience, those I met in NZ are almost certainly not afraid of humans, I remembered the New Zealand Robin actually hopped to us when we are attempting to take photos, and so are the friendly Coots, I am sure a Coot is always very far away when it reached this region as vagrants, I have seen extremely friendly Barn Swallow at one location in Ipoh where they are not harm, completely nearly fully ignoring the humans, most other places, it is impossible.

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