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Yellow-fronted Canary appears in Canada

on 20th September 2009

“I read articles posted on your website about the Yellow-fronted Canary (Serinus mozambicus). I was amazed at the reports.

“I have discovered a Yellow-fronted Canary at my bird feeder in the past week. I live in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. This is a very long way from its native habitat.

“I am sending *two photographs of this bird for positive identification. I believe it to be a wild species. It is not banded, and was possibly taken from the wild and sold into illegal markets and has somehow found its way to my city, a seaport in the north Atlantic.

“Could you post this report, as it would help in educating readers about the ban placed on the export of these birds for illegal sale to foreign markets, as a result of contagious avian diseases.”

Keith Fillier
St. John’s
Newfoundland
Canada
16th September 2009

Summerian Turks, who wrote on the status of the Yellow-fronted Canary and the extent of the international trade earlier (see HERE), confirms the identification of the bird, adding that from its facial markings, it is likely to be a male. The female usually has more grey on the underparts.

*Only one photograph posted here.

If you like this post please tap on the Like button at the left bottom of page. Any views and opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the authors/contributors, and are not endorsed by the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM, NUS) or its affiliated institutions. Readers are encouraged to use their discretion before making any decisions or judgements based on the information presented.

YC Wee

Dr Wee played a significant role as a green advocate in Singapore through his extensive involvement in various organizations and committees: as Secretary and Chairman for the Malayan Nature Society (Singapore Branch), and with the Nature Society (Singapore) as founding President (1978-1995). He has also served in the Nature Reserve Board (1987-1989), Nature Reserves Committee (1990-1996), National Council on the Environment/Singapore Environment Council (1992-1996), Work-Group on Nature Conservation (1992) and Inter-Varsity Council on the Environment (1995-1997). He is Patron of the Singapore Gardening Society and was appointed Honorary Museum Associate of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) in 2012. In 2005, Dr Wee started the Bird Ecology Study Group. With more than 6,000 entries, the website has become a valuable resource consulted by students, birdwatchers and researchers locally and internationally. The views and opinions expressed in this article are his own, and do not represent those of LKCNHM, the National University of Singapore or its affiliated institutions.

Other posts by YC Wee

2 Responses

  1. THANK-YOU FOR YOUR TIME IN POSTING MY DISCOVERY.

    I HAVE NOT SEEN THE YELLOW-FRONTED FOR THE LAST WEEK, BUT I FEEL HE HAS BEEN ADOPTED INTO A FLOCK OF AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES, AS THESE ARE THE BIRDS HE WAS SITED WITH MOST FREQUENTLY AT MY FEEDER.

    MOST MIGRATE SOUTH, AS THE WINTER IN CANADA WOULD BE MUCH TOO SEVERE FOR THIS BIRD.

    I HAVE BEEN CHECKING TO FIND IF THIS BIRD IS BEING BRED IN CAPTIVITY. IT SEEMS THERE ARE VERY FEW BREEDERS OF THIS SPECIES IN NORTH AMERICA.

    I HAVE COLLECTED A LARGE AMOUNT OF DATA FROM MY RESEARCH, AND SOME BREEDERS HAVE HELPED ME IN MY SEARCH.

    MY FEELING IS THAT THIS BIRD MAY HAVE BEEN A WILD SPECIES, TRAPPED AND CAGED THEN SOLD IN A MARKET SOMEWHERE IN THE EAST. IT WAS MOST PROBABLY KEPT AS A PET ABOARD A LARGE CARGO SHIP. IT ESCAPED SOMEWHERE IN THE ATLANTIC AND FOUND ITS WAY TO ST. JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA.

    THE BIRD AS A DOMESTIC SPECIES IS MOST COMMONLY CALLED THE GREEN SINGER.

    I BELIEVE PERSONALLY, THAT ALL EXOTIC BIRDS BELONG IN THEIR NATURAL AND NATIVE HABITAT. THAT IS WHERE WE SHOULD STUDY THEM, AND IT IS WHERE THEY PROPERLY BELONG.

    AGAIN, THANKS SO MUCH.

  2. Pingback: canary breeders

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